Science Courses
Courses by Course Numbers - click title to see course description and prerequisites 
6500 – Applied Science (11-12)
6606 – Environmental Science - Online (11-12)
6610– Comparative Anatomy (11-12)
6699 – Chem in the Community (10-12) 
6700 – Accelerated Chem A (10-12) 
 
6920 – CIS College Physics A (11-12)
6921 – CIS College Physics B (11-12)
6925 – CIS Physics/Inquiry A (11-12)
6926 – CIS Physics/Inquiry B (11-12)
 
Course # 6991 – Physical Science 9A - Physics (9)
This is a required introductory physics course for all 9th grade students. The topics covered will include forces, Newton’s laws of motion, work, power, energy, sound waves, and electricity. The environmental and economic impacts of harnessing various non-nuclear energy resources will also be discussed. Science lab skills will be improved through many inquiry-based activities. Students will apply mathematics skills to the science content in this course.
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Course # 6992 – Physical Science 9B - Chemistry (9)
This is a required introductory chemistry course for all 9th grade students. The topics covered will include atomic theory, the organization of the periodic table, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, and nuclear reactions. The environmental and economic impacts of harnessing nuclear energy will also be discussed. Science lab skills will be improved through many inquiry-based activities. Students will apply mathematics skills to the science content in this course.
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Course # 6995 – Advanced Physical Science 9A - Physics (9)
Course # 6996 – Advanced Physical Science 9B - Chemistry (9)

These courses are designed for the student who has high interest in the science area, preparing students for CIS or AP courses in 10-12th grade. Topics discussed will be in greater and complexity than 9A & 9B. Students must have earned an ‘A’ or ‘B’ in 8th grade science AND math. Selection will be based on application, teacher recommendation, and administrative approval.
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Course # 6501 – Field and Forensic Biology A (11-12)blood splatter

Recommendation: Completion of Chemistry or Physics prior to taking this course.
Successful completion of this course and Field & Forensic Biology B will satisfy the one credit in biology required for graduation.
This course approaches the science of biology from the perspective of both a field ecologist and forensic scientists. In Field and Forensic Biology A, students will focus on science process, ecological interactions, biochemistry, evolution and cell biology. Students will engage in many lab experiments to simulate a forensic scientist trying to solve mysteries or crimes. Students who received credit for Field and Forensic Biology A cannot receive credit for Biology A. Students who received credit for Biology A cannot receive credit for Field and Forensic Biology A.
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Course # 6502 – Field and Forensic Biology B (11-12)
Successful completion of this course and Field & Forensic Biology A will satisfy the one credit in biology required for graduation.
Field and Forensic Biology B continues the study of biology where Field and Forensic Biology A ends. Students will explore the science of DNA and learn how to extract DNA from cellular material. They will use DNA and patterns of genetic inheritance to investigate and solve crimes. In addition, Field and Forensic Biology B will investigate the topics of metabolism, energy and ecosystem dynamics. Cumulative field biology and forensic skills will be applied to deepen the understanding of ecology and evolution. Students who received credit for Field and Forensic Biology B cannot receive credit for Biology B. Students who received credit for Biology B cannot receive credit for Field and Forensic Biology B.
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Course # 6600 – Ecology (Area Learning Center ONLY)
Minnesota is a biologically diverse state because we exist at the convergence of three major land biomes and we are home to three different freshwater biomes. In this course, students will study the characteristics of the biomes of the world with special attention being given to the biomes of Minnesota. During the course of this study, students will also learn about classification and claudistics, energy roles in an ecosystem, succession, chemical and biological water testing, and environmental issues facing Minnesota’s future.
and Forensic Biology B.
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Course # 6601 – Biology A (11-12)
Recommendation: Completion of Chemistry or Physics prior to taking this course.
Successful completion of this course and Biology B will satisfy the one credit in biology required for graduation.
What makes people sick? Why are people alive? What hidden worlds exist beyond people's eyes? Biology A takes students through a journey that investigates these questions as well as the nature of life and living organisms. Students become scientists as they discover organisms that inhabit both visible and invisible spaces. Students will pursue the nature of cells, life’s energy, and human body systems. The focus of this course is on problem solving in science through activities and lab investigations. Students who received credit for Field and Forensic Biology A cannot receive credit for Biology A.
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Course # 6602 – Biology B (11-12)
Prerequisite: Biology A. Successful completion of this course and Biology A will satisfy the one credit in biology required for graduation.
Jeans or Genes? Join Biology B to crack the genetic code. Investigate past, present, and future secrets held in DNA. Heredity, adaptation, genetic engineering, selective breeding and mutation are some of the topics explored in Biology B. Students will learn to apply experimental techniques to discover how DNA and genes operate. Students will also link the structure and function of DNA and genes to evolutionary change and the struggle for existence. Students who received credit for Field and Forensic Biology B cannot receive credit for Biology B.
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Course # 6605 – Environmental Science (11-12)
This is a course that focuses on the complexity of natural and environmental systems. Through the application of the scientific method, students will participate and initiate research projects that examine all aspects of environmental stability. In their research, students will analyze the way humans impact and interact with their natural environments, and learn what is being done to preserve and conserve environmental areas into the future.
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Course # 6608 – Minnesota Forests (Area Learning Center ONLY)
Our diverse forests are one of the most unique characteristics of Minnesota’s natural resources. Students in this course will study basic plant biology and taxonomy as it pertains to Minnesota flora. Students will apply this new knowledge to design, set-up, and conduct a long-term inquiry based plant experiment. Students will also study the techniques used for various forestry field skills, positives and negatives of different logging techniques, forest pests and diseases, and spend time looking at the current environmental issues facing the health and future of our Minnesota forests.

Course # 6611 – Human Anatomy and Physiology
Students will study the physical and chemical nature of human body systems. Modeled around an introductory college-level course, students will use scientific literature, text books, lecture, and labs to understand the details of five body systems. This class is a great option for students interested in pursuing a career in health care or a related field.
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Course # 6612 – Crimialistics (Area Learning Center ONLY)
Discover the differences between the Hollywood version CSI and true forensic science. This course is designed to investigate the real-world applications of using science in the analysis of crime scene evidence. Students will study the many jobs of the criminalist and learn how to apply forensic science principles through units focused on processing crime scenes, fingerprints, DNA, handwriting analysis, tool marks, blood and blood spatter, determining time of death, forensic anthropology, and forensic entomology.
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Course # 6615 – Advanced Placement Biology A (11-12)
Course # 6616 – Advanced Placement Biology B (11-12)
Course # 6617 – Advanced Placement Biology C (11-12)

Prerequisites: Recommended math—successful completion of Algebra II (A & B). Completion of a full year of Chemistry or Physics 
Ranger U This is a college-level biology course. Its function is to give highly motivated students an opportunity to gain college credit at the high school level or provide high school students with an extremely strong background in biology. This course covers all of the standard biology topics such as the cell, cellular chemistry, plant and animal anatomy, genetics, evolution, growth & differentiation, population dynamics, and ecology. It is expected that a student in an AP class will take the Advanced Placement Exam for that course. AP national exams are offered in May. Successful completion of AP Biology A, B and C satisfies the biology graduation requirement.
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Course # 6620 – Biology at the Extremes (Area Learning Center ONLY)
This course will study the of habitability of different environments in the universes. Students will discover the requirements that need to be met in order for an organisms to be considered living. Then the students will explore the physical requirements that an environment needs to provide in order to sustain life. This field of science searches for extreme habits on Earth and planets both within our solar system and elsewhere in the universe that could be habitable environments for life. Students will learn about the search for evidence that life may once have occurred on Mars or elsewhere in our solar system through the Mars rovers and various NASA space missions. Finally, students will study the ways in which living organisms have adapted and will have to adapt to survive the challenges that extreme Earth ecosystems can present and the challenges of surviving in the microgravity of space.
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Course # 6701 – Chemistry A (10-12)
Course # 6702 – Chemistry B (10-12)

Recommended: Students who take this course should be on grade level in math – receiving at least a C in Algebra IA/IB or a higher math course. To build a stronger science foundation before taking this course, consider taking Earth and Space Science first.
Chemistry A and Chemistry B fulfills the 1.0 credit physical science graduation requirement for the graduating class of 2015 and 2016.
Students must pass Chemistry A to continue onto Chemistry B.This course is ideal for the student who asks the question: “Why are certain gases poisonous or why do some substances dissolve in water and others don’t?” Chemistry focuses on the interaction of matter and energy in chemical reactions. Concepts include periodic trends, chemical bonding, writing formulas for compounds and reactions, stoichiometry, acids and bases, and gases and organic. Students will perform experiments individually and collaboratively. Chemistry B allows for opportunities to complete several inquiry type labs.
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Course # 6712 - Advanced Placement Chemistry - A (10-12)
Course # 6713 - Advanced Placement Chemistry - B (10-12)
Course # 6714 - Advanced Placement Chemistry - C (10-12)

Prerequisite: successful completion of Accelerated Science 9 and C or better in Geometry or with science teacher approval OR students may take this as an elective course after completion of Chemistry A and B or Physics A and B. This is a college-level chemistry course.
Ranger U Its function is to give highly motivated students an opportunity to gain college credit at the high school level or to provide high school students with an extremely strong background in chemistry This course covers all of the standard chemistry topics such as atomic and molecular structure, bonding, periodic trends, thermodynamics, electro-chemistry, chemical reactions, kinetics and equilibrium, etc. Students will develop lab skills using university-level equipment and techniques. It is expected that a student in an AP class will take the Advanced Placement Exam for that course. AP national exams are offered in May.
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Course # 6805 – Meteorology (Weather) (10-12)
Meteorology introduces students to basic weather concepts, instrumentation, and maps. Students will learn about various aspects of weather, including the atmosphere, seasons, severe weather, and much more. Weather data will be collected from instruments used by the students outside and around the school in addition to using data from the weather station on rooftop of Forest Lake Senior High.
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Course # 6806 – Earth and Space Science (10-12)
In this required course, students will investigate Earth and Space through four major units: plate tectonics, including earthquakes and volcanoes; geologic time and fossils; earth's changing climate; and, the universe. Students will read about Icelandic volcanoes, drill core from Antarctica, and the Mars Curiosity Rover.
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Course # 6901 – Topics in Physics A (10-12)

Successful completion of this course and Topics in Physics B will satisfy the requirement of one full year of chemistry or physics.
This course teaches the essential physics that students need in order to understand today's core science and technology issues. Understanding of motion and energy, friction and freefall, as well as projectile and rotational motion will be developed in the context of explaining existing technology and evaluating the variety of new technologies on the market. Although some Algebra 1 math skills will be used, the emphasis will be on conceptual understanding and application.
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Course # 6902 – Topics in Physics B (10-12)
Successful completion of this course and Topics in Physics A will satisfy the requirement of one full year of chemistry or physics.
This course teaches the essential physics that students need in order to understand today's core science and technology issues. Understanding of sound and light, electricity and magnetism, as well as heat will be developed in the context of explaining existing technology and evaluating the variety of new technologies on the market. Although some Algebra 1 math skills will be used, the emphasis will be on conceptual understanding and application.
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Course # 6905 – Physics A (10-12)
Recommended: Students who take this course should be on grade level in math – receiving at least a C in Algebra 1.
Physics A and Physics B fulfills the 1.0 credit physical science graduation requirement. In Physics A, students will study Newton’s laws of motion and investigate motion, energy, and momentum. These investigations will include lab work, models, graphs, and mathematical equations.
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Course # 6906 – Physics B (10-12)
Recommended: Students who take this course should be on grade level in math – receiving at least a C in Algebra 1.
Physics A and Physics B fulfills the 1.0 credit physical science graduation requirement. In Physics B students will study sound, light, electricity, magnetism and heat through lab activities that drive our discussion and problem solving.
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Course # 6907 – Advanced Placement Physics 1A (10-12)
Course # 6908 – Advanced Placement Physics 1B (10-12)
Course # 6909 – Advanced Placement Physics 1C (10-12)

Prerequisite: Completion or concurrent enrollment of Algebra II
Ranger U AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of Physics through inquiry-based investigations as they explor topics such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits. It is expected that a student in an AP class will take the Advanced Placement Exam for the course. AP national exams are offered in May. After the AP exam, additional topics surrounding light, magnetism, and heat will be studied so that this course meets the graduation requirements for 1 year of physics/chemistry. Students must sign up for all 3 sections of AP Physics
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Course # 6910 – Advanced Placement Physics - Mechanics A (Calculus based) (11-12)
Course # 6911 – Advanced Placement Physics - Mechanics B (Calculus based) (11-12)

Prerequisite: Enrollment in or completion of AP Calculus
Ranger U This two-term course covers the study of motion at an advanced placement level . Topics include Newtons’ laws, accounting for friction, simple harmonic motion, circular motion, energy, and momentum. At the end of the Mechanics II term, students will participate in the Advanced Placement Physics C exam as well as participate in a Rube Goldberg machine design competition. It is expected that a student in an AP class will take the Advanced Placement Exam for that course. AP national exams are offered in May.
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COURSES NOT CURRENTLY OFFERED 

Course # 6500 – Applied Science (11-12)
Prerequisite: Student is not currently enrolled, or has not completed any previous science class in grades 10-12. Student may not self-register for this course, instructor permission is required at the time of registration.
The Applied Science course does not satisfy admission requirements for post-high school programs. This course is offered to enable students with reading difficulties (approximately grade 6.5 or below) an opportunity to begin the science requirements for graduation. This course is not preparation for trade school, technical college, or college. The way we live and the machines we use demand some knowledge of why things work the way they do. Some unit examples are: consumer chemistry, nuclear issues, measurements in science, electricity, simple machines, and classification of matter. Students will be asked to take part in current science topic discussions. Laboratory experiments will be conducted to help students understand the concepts of the unit. Assigned work must be completed to receive credit. A pass-fail system of grading will be used.

Course # 6606 – Environmental Science - Online (11-12) (Not offered in 2016-2017)
This class will cover the same elements as the in-school Environmental Science class but will offer students the flexibility of an on-line class format. This class will allow students to complete and submit most of the work at home, while still having the ability to meet with the teacher when help is needed. Students are required to attend class on set meeting dates for lectures, tests, and meetings with the teacher. 

Course
# 6610– Comparative Anatomy (11-12)
Prerequisite: Completion of Biology Credit.
Thinking about pursuing a career in the health sciences, veterinary medicine, or biology? Then this course is for you!
Comparative anatomy explores how anatomical form matches physiological function. Students begin by studying the evolutionary relationships between all animals as a way to better understand human anatomy and physiology. Throughout the course, students will use dissection and labs to discover similarities and differences across the major animal phyla, and use these lessons to understand the complexities that regulate and coordinate human body systems.  
 
Course # 6699 – Chemistry in the Community (10-12)
Prerequisite: Students with reading level 6.5 or lower must first complete Applied Science. Successful completion of this course will satisfy the one-half credit in chemistry required for graduation. 
Target population — students planning a non-science career or students interested in the impact of science and technology on society. Chemistry in the Community (ChemCom) is a course designed by the American Chemical Society to help students recognize the applications of chemistry in their daily lives. It provides basic chemistry knowledge on which to base decisions about societal issues involving science and technology. Both the potential benefits and limitations of technology in solving community problems are explored through environmental case studies. Topics may include water quality, recycling, nuclear waste disposal, plastics manufacturing, global warming, and ozone depletion. Students who received credit for Chemistry A or Accelerated Chemistry A cannot receive credit for this course. 

Course # 6700 – Accelerated Chemistry A (10-12)
Successful completion of this course will satisfy the 1/2 credit in chemistry required for graduation.
Target population — students planning a career in science or enrolling in advanced placement science courses. Accelerated Chemistry A has the same course outline as Chemistry A, with the addition of quantum and wave theory. This course is a prerequisite for AP biology if students do not enroll in Biology A or Biology B. Topics are covered in greater depth and with more rigor than in Chemistry A. Lab experiments will teach college-level lab techniques. This course is designed to better prepare students for AP chemistry, AP exams, and for college majors in science, engineering, and medicine. Students who received credit for Chemistry A cannot receive credit for this course. 
 
Course # 6920 – CIS College Physics A (11-12)
Course # 6921 – CIS College Physics B (11-12)

Prerequisite: 3.0 cumulative GPA or consent of instructor and completion of Algebra IIB.
College physics is a two term course that covers traditional physics--often called Newtonian physics. It seeks to explore why objects have motion and how the motion can be modified. Applications include automobile design, amusement park ride design and sports movement theory. Labs use college-level equipment and lab reports are more extensive than in Physics B (course 6906). This course also has a writing intensive component to the laboratory reports which will fulfill a University of Minnesota freshman technical writing requirement. Successful completion of this 2-term course may enable students to receive 4 college credits from the University of Minnesota. 

Course # 6925 – CIS Physics by Inquiry A (11-12) (Not offered in 2016-2017)
Course # 6926 – CIS Physics by Inquiry B (11-12) (Not offered in 2016-2017)

Prerequisite: Students must have completed Algebra lI with a B or better and be in the top 50% of their class.
The goal of this course is to give students hands-on experience with the process of scientific discovery. Students will learn fundamental concepts in physics by examining evidence gathered in their own experimentation. During the class period, there will be little to no lecture by the instructor. Emphasis will be placed on small group work, devising theories as to how things work, and communicating their discoveries through written lab reports. Topics to be covered may include Properties of Matter, Heat and Temperature, Electrical Circuits, Light and Optics, and Laws of Motion. If the student enrolls in a degree program at the University of Minnesota, this course meets the University of Minnesota’s general education requirements for a physical science lab course. Successful completion of this 2-term course may enable students to receive 4 college credits from the University of Minnesota. 
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